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Outdoors lifestraw-mission

Published on January 18th, 2017 | by Greg

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LifeStraw Mission: Clean & Safe Water, Anywhere

It might be 2017, but we still live in a world where drinking water cannot and should not be taken for granted. And while most Western cities have access to clean water on tap, there are plenty of areas of the world where the supplies are not perfectly safe- rural areas, much of China and Africa, and of course, Flint, Michigan. Water filtration devices come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, but their goal is much different from your average purifier- the mission is to remove harmful impurities rather than simply make your water taste a bit better.

Speaking of which, the LifeStraw Mission is aptly named- the predecessor was originally built as a simple, cost-effective, and easy-to-transport and use method to remove guinea worm larvae, a major issue in some parts of Africa. The new, latest model is larger and more sophisticated, featuring a bag that you can fill up and filter over time by hanging it on a tree or branch and letting gravity do the work, rather than needing to slowly use suction. The company’s method and their updated .02 micron filter claims to remove 99.9999% of bacteria, 99.999% of virus and 99.99% of protozoa, and similar technology has been used across their lineup, with no batteries or power required, nor any iodine, tablets or other chemicals.

Now, there are limits- it cannot remove salt or work as a desalination solution, nor can it remove chemicals or metal contaminants from your H20. And the filter won’t last forever, but is built to last long enough for a person to purify their water for a couple of decades, 18,000 liters or so until it needs replacement. If you’re a single person, though, you might be able to simply use one of their other models, ranging from water bottles to ultra-lightweight tubes- this one is perfect for a couple, group, or family who is going camping or hiking. It folds or rolls up tightly for compact packing, and once full, has a nice handle and straps for easy suspension.

If it’s good enough for humanitarian use after natural disasters, from Haiti to the Philippines, then it will definitely suffice for most any use you’re likely to face. And for each LifeStraw you purchase, one school child in a developing community receives safe drinking water for an entire school year. Available in 5 or 12-liter capacities, only the bag is different as the mechanism stays the same. They’ve distributed over 37 million LifeStraws over the years, and you can pick up your own LifeStraw Mission for around $120, online and in stores.

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About the Author

Greg dreamed up the idea for the Truly Network while living in Hawaii, which began with a single site called TrulyObscure. In 2010, when advertisers and readers were requesting coverage beyond the scope of that site, TrulyNet was launched, reaching a broader audience over a variety of niche sites. Formerly the head technology correspondent for the Des Moines Register at age 16, he has since lived and worked in five states and two countries, helping a list of organizations and companies that includes the United States Census Bureau, TripAdvisor, Events Photo Group, Berlitz, and Computer Geeks. He also served as the Content Strategy Manager for HearPlanet, a multi-platform app that has reached over a million users and has been featured in the New York Times, Hemispheres Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, Fox Business News, PC Magazine, and even Appleā€™s own iPhone ads. Greg has written as a restaurant critic and feature journalist for a number of national and international publications, including City Weekend Magazine, Red Egg Magazine, the Newton Daily News, Capital Change Magazine, and an arm of China Daily, Beijing Weekend. In addition, he has served as a consulting editor for the Foreign Language Press of Beijing, as well as a writer and editor for the George Washington University Hatchet, the school newspaper of his alma mater. Originally from Iowa, Greg is currently living in the West Village of Manhattan.



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